Commentary 01-Talk Pidgin

What we know as pidgin in Hawaii is a way of speaking that many consider to be “broken” or “poor” English. This could not be farther from the truth. Pidgin is actually a Creole and is known as Hawaii Creole English. While it may share some features of the English language, it is separate and has distinct linguistic characteristics unto itself. Part of the reason pidgin is a “birthright” in Hawaii, is because it represents a way in which people of all ethnic backgrounds and origins found a means to bridge the cultural gap to communicate.

Pretty ignorant and unprofessional, huh? I mean, why would it matter for people to communicate with one another in a diverse environment. Why not just stay the same or even better, make other people communicate the way they did? Obviously, that’s the more logical choice. It was for the colonizers who came here and saw a culture that was foreign and obscene, I mean, c’mon the Hawaiians didn’t wear cloths, certainly not in the missionary style of fashion, that’s for sure.

I used to resent American culture. Hear me out before jumping the gun on “Hawaii is a part of America”. Yes, Hawaii is a part of America, illegally, but I am digressing. The reason I resented American culture is because there is a wonderful and unique way of life here in Hawaii that has always been throughout time. A problem other people have with us that I’ve heard time and time again is that it’s too slow here. I think what we end up with here is people who don’t know how to be. We have all this rich history and there is so much to be proud of yet, for generations it’s been suppressed. It began with people coming here and telling the Hawaiians don’t practice this belief and it continues today with people saying things like don’t talk pidgin.

Here’s a Joe Moore for you:
Did you know? Iolani Palace had electricity before the White House and Buckingham Palace.

Pretty ignorant, uh? I mean how could someone who didn’t speak English as first language do something before the two most populous English-speaking nations at the time? Perhaps, because it didn’t matter what he spoke or how he spoke but more about what he did. Just a thought…

Here we are kids, generations of people, who didn’t choose to be born here but were, who love it, and are told time and time again, this isn’t the way. But this is my way… This is the way of the children of yesterday, today, and tomorrow. It’s how it is here just as it is how it is there in other places. We aren’t trying to change. Other people are trying to change us. Yeah, Hawaii is not the mainland. And? Let the mainland be the mainland and so on. We can still co-exist because what makes is different is not as important as what makes us the same.

Am I American? Sure. Am I a hamster? Sure why not? Because some people probably see me running on a wheel going nowhere? Am I… it doesn’t even matter? What does it matter to categorize and box us as people? Break it all apart and we just are people, break it apart further and we’re organic tissue, even more and we’re just energy. So why do we continue to tear one another apart through differences or beliefs that hold one thing greater than the next? It’s time we pick each other up, find what makes us the same, and realize there is more than one way, different vehicles, to go from point A to point B.

Pidgin, the birthright, one that is open to anyone born anywhere, because that was the dream of the Kingdom, a place where anyone, no matter the race, could come and live, just be.

Watch the walls come crashing down in the years to come. Deny it as much as you want. Stay far away. Go read a book. Knit a sweater. Do your thing. Because people are going to find more ways come together. The old school locals did it with pidgin. Just a matter of time before people get it together on a more macro level and continue to bridge the gap.

Shoots.

JMAW

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